FAQs

  1. Why is special education so important to the community?
  2. What do specialists bring to the table?
  3. What is scaffolding?
  4. What is a SLP?
  5. What is an OT?
  6. Why is play important?
  7. Why would a school district or ESD contact you for help?
  8. How do you ensure the highest quality of service to students and districts?
  9. When hiring staff, what do you look for in a candidate?
  10. We’re considering a private speech therapist. What will that cost?
  11. Do you provide daily subs for speech language pathologists in the schools? Or extra help for short-term testing?
  12. Why is this so personal?


  1. Why is special education so important to the community?

    Special education provides students with different learning needs the opportunity to access general education to build personal skill sets and knowledge. The long-term goal for students with unique learning needs is the same for students that are typical learners, we aim for productive citizenship and employment as an adult.

  2. What do specialists bring to the table?

    Speech-language pathologists and occupational therapists identify students’ strengths and challenges within a school setting. Based on a child’s needs, they are then able to scaffold instruction to a child’s ability level to ensure their participation and success.

  3. What is scaffolding?

    Imagine a ladder with 10 steps to accomplish a classroom objective. Many students with typical learning skills start on step 7 and begin moving forward and up in response to teacher instruction. Students with unique learning challenges often begin on a lower step and need modification or accommodations to move forward and up a step. These students may need step 4 broken into mini sub-steps to accomplish that demand. A skilled specialist is able to help teachers identify how far to scaffold a task, what supports would assist the child, and what level of support may be needed.

  4. What is a SLP?

    Speech-language pathologists, sometimes called speech therapists, assess, diagnose, treat, and help to prevent disorders related to speech, language, cognitive-communication, voice, swallowing, and fluency.

    Speech-language pathologists work with people who cannot produce speech sounds or cannot produce them clearly; those with speech rhythm and fluency problems, such as stuttering; people with voice disorders, such as inappropriate pitch or harsh voice; those with problems understanding and producing language; those who wish to improve their communication skills by modifying an accent; and those with cognitive communication impairments, such as attention, memory, and problem-solving disorders. They also work with people who have swallowing difficulties.

  5. What is an OT?

    Occupational therapists help clients improve their ability to perform tasks in living and working environments. They work with individuals who suffer from a mentally, physically, developmentally, or emotionally disabling condition. Occupational therapists use treatments to develop, recover, or maintain the daily living and work skills of their patients. The therapist helps clients not only to improve their basic motor functions and reasoning abilities, but also to compensate for permanent loss of function. The goal is to help clients have independent, productive, and satisfying lives.

  6. Why is play important?

    Through play, children learn about themselves and the world around them. It helps children understand their environment and gives them a chance to learn and to practice new skills. Here are just a few examples of what your child learns and practices every time he/she plays: the ability to problem-solve, think logically, communicate/interact with others, socially acceptable behaviors, creativity, flexibility, and the ability to adapt to situations. In addition, gross motor play is important to developing fine motor skills, such as, speech.

  7. Why would a school district or ESD contact you for help?

    School districts committed to superior service are always interested in additional resources to identify high quality service providers. High workloads for staff, family leaves, vacancies, short-term medical leaves can all result in the need for administrators to contact us for assistance. We can even provide substitutes if staff are ill. We have a reputation for being easy to work with, transparent, and for being student focused. Not to mention that our clinicians are second to none!

  8. How do you ensure the highest quality of service to students and districts?

    We are a hands-on group. We provide our own site supervision of our independent contractors to ensure they are meeting our high expectations and the needs of the workload and district. We are interested in the priorities of a building to ensure we are an effective part of the team. Our clinicians are all offered free continuing education throughout the school year and our network of specialists is always available to visit a staff member that may want another opinion on a therapy approach.

  9. When considering an independent contractor to join your team, what do you look for in the candidate?

    We want to know what is important to you as a clinician, professionally and personally. We look for folks who ask smart questions, who are curious, who are open to problem-solving challenges. Experience working in the public schools is important. We are not interested in someone who already knows most everything. We love the folks that are strong enough to ask for help. Our consistent delivery of superior service comes from staff with passionate whys and a belief in the power of service within the schools. Candidates must be a good fit for our culture of collaboration, sharing, energy, and learning.

  10. We’re considering a private speech therapist. What will that cost?

    There is no set reimbursement rate for clinicians with their own private practice. We encourage you to check out our resource page for referrals or call around and ask this question. Be sure to also ask if that clinician or clinic takes insurance if you’re looking to use such coverage. Our experience is that private rates can average $120.00/hour, with evaluations higher than that. We pride ourselves on offering a significantly less expensive rate to the school districts with whom we work.

  11. Do you provide daily subs for speech language pathologists in the schools? Or extra help for short-term testing?

    YES! Teachers get subs but in the past it has been unrealistic to schedule a sub for a building’s speech pathologist. The result can be lost service time to students, delayed evaluations, and an increasing burden on building SLPs upon their return to “catch up”.

    We pride ourselves on stepping in and following a district’s lead. If referrals are overwhelming a team, we can often ease the workload by assisting with evaluation. You may contract with us for as little as a day at a time. However, we are honest that fulfilling obligations to our year-long standing agreements always have priority.

  12. Why is this so personal?

    Some of us have children with special learning needs. Some of us have family members that have struggled. Some of us want to raise the bar, protect, secure, or dream for the children in our community. We each have our own ‘why’ as to why we do this emotional work. We encourage you to explore those whys on our team webpage. Every assignment is very personal.